An Introduction to IBM Rational Application Developer: A Guided Tour (Ibm Illustrated Guide Series)

An Introduction to IBM Rational Application Developer: A Guided Tour (Ibm Illustrated Guide Series)

An Introduction to IBM Rational Application Developer: A Guided Tour (Ibm Illustrated Guide Series)

  • Is perfect for all skill levels–from first steps to advanced topics
  • Reinforces learning through practical hands-on interactive tutorials
  • Uses modular chapters and freestanding tutorials
  • Presents tutorials using a variety of database types
  • including IBM Cloudscape-IBM DB2 Universal Database-Microsoft SQL Server-Sybase Enterprise Systems-and Oracle Database

IBM Rational Application Developer is a very important tool for developers, but it is also a complex product. An Introduction to IBM Rational Application Developer, A Guided Tour is designed to jumpstart the learning process with its focus on interactive hands-on learning through a wide variety of useful, practical, end-to-end tutorials.

Hands-on exercises and in-depth explanations form chapter “modules” within the book, thereby providing a complete step-by-step guide to each specific top

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3 thoughts on “An Introduction to IBM Rational Application Developer: A Guided Tour (Ibm Illustrated Guide Series)

  1. 7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    good tutorials on RAD, August 23, 2005
    By 
    Jeanne Boyarsky (New York, NY) –

    This review is from: An Introduction to IBM Rational Application Developer: A Guided Tour (Ibm Illustrated Guide Series) (Paperback)
    “An Introduction to IBM Rational Application Developer – A Guided Tour” is a good beginners book. The book does not assume you know J2EE. For example, it walks you through what a Servlet is. Each chapter begins with an overview of the technology, which is even more useful for advanced topics like JMS.

    The authors walk you through tutorials for the common RAD tasks. If you are already using WSAD, some of the tutorials are overkill. However, the advanced ones are still useful. The authors also provide tips of things that would be good to experiment with. I also found the example projects on CD to be extremely useful.

    This IBM Press book doesn’t contain much IBM slant. The book uses many common databases including db2, Oracle and SQL Server in each example. Tons of screenshots and code snippets are provided. The authors provide tips on the tool throughout that make you a more efficient developer.

    Each chapter stands alone, making the book a good one to read before you try out a new part of RAD. I recommend this book to people new to the WSAD/RAD family of tools or those who want a detailed walkthrough of how to create a basic application in new technologies.

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  2. 9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    powerful development of Java applications under WebSphere, November 10, 2005
    By 
    W Boudville (Terra, Sol 3) –
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    This review is from: An Introduction to IBM Rational Application Developer: A Guided Tour (Ibm Illustrated Guide Series) (Paperback)
    The RAD is a powerful way to develop Java applications for use in WebSphere. The authors presuppose prior knowledge of Java on your part. So that when they give examples of Java code, they do not have to go into a detailed explanation of the elementary syntax within these.

    In the J2EE world, matters have grown to the extent that there is now a huge amount of classes and applications that one can learn. A formidable commitment. What the text shows is how to do many of these tasks under RAD for WebSphere. From a simple developing of a standalone Java application to doing servlet and Java Server Pages web development. RAD has an easy user interface, with convenient helper capabilities that reduces some of the tedious burden. Like being able to quickly compile and run a program that consists of several classes.

    If you have already used Eclipse, the good news is that RAD derives from Eclipse 3. And RAD supports what is still the latest version of J2EE – 1.4. (Version 1.5 has not yet been officially released.)

    The book also explains more advanced Java topics. As in Web Services, a potentially promising new field. It turns out to be pretty easy to build and publish a Web Service with RAD. Takes a lot of the mystique out of what it means to write your own Web Service. This alone can be a big plus for the book, to some of you.

    Database interactions are also a practical part of many websites. I fully expected that the text would only deal with hooking to DB2. This is an IBM Press book, after all, and the authors hail from IBM. But surprisingly and commendably, the book shows how to connect to 5 databases – DB2, Cloudscape (which is from IBM), Microsoft SQL Server, Sybase and Oracle. A pragmatic recognition that not everyone uses DB2. The various database examples may also help you develop database analysis code that is as independent of the specific database as possible.

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  3. 7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Tutorial on target, but a lack of technical proofing, November 23, 2005
    By 
    Big H (Pittsburgh, PA) –

    This review is from: An Introduction to IBM Rational Application Developer: A Guided Tour (Ibm Illustrated Guide Series) (Paperback)
    I admit that this book is right on target for how it is structured for people to learn the fundamentals from the ground up. It follows a natural learning format from beginning to end. However, the book is riddled with programming inconsistences and errors. For example, you are left to figure out parameters that are named one way, but are written differently on another page for the same program (see page 48 => arg2.doFilter should be chain.doFilter). Also, there are instances where the book tells you that you will find certain things within a perspective, but when using the IDE, you find the book is not accurate (see page 57=>cannot see Servlets tab when double-clicking on the Web Perspective Deployment Descriptor, but it is in the Java Perspective when you double-click the Web.xml file). The book was written in a hurry, it appears, and is really for a developer who can see the mistakes and correct them on the fly when going through the tutorials.

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